simon-martin:

Hand o’ graphs: this bizarre book of outlines of hands dates to the early twentieth-century. It was found by the artists Clare Woods and Des Hughes (who has a fascination in the macabre ‘hand of glory’). Hand o’graphs were presumably a kind of esoteric interpretive activity, like graphology, phrenology or palmistry, in which character traits would be read into the shape of the hand. There is something rather unsettling about the fact that these pages were touched by the hands of these long-dead people , including one that was murdered in the Russian Revolution. It’s the kind of object that could be used in a seance - eerie and macabre.

celestebyers:

Things my Uncle Billy said to me in the kitchen. 

celestebyers:

Things my Uncle Billy said to me in the kitchen

virtual-artifacts:

Poland, 19th C. Egg decorated with micrographic text from the Song of Songs. Handwritten in ink. From the 18th century, and perhaps even earlier, hollow eggs on which sacred texts had been written in micrography were used to decorate European sukkahs. Not all the texts related directly to the holiday of Sukkot, the Festival of Booths: this example has Song of Songs 1-4:7 inscribed in miniscule letters. At times feathers were added to the hanging egg, so that it looked like a bird in flight.”

abigailweibel:

This is tricky.

abigailweibel:

This is tricky.

theparisreview:

Haruki Murakami, the Art of Fiction No. 182

theparisreview:

Haruki Murakami, the Art of Fiction No. 182

theparisreview:

Manuscript page from Orhan Pamuk’s notebook for The Black Book.

I really want to know what colour ink he’s using.

theparisreview:

Manuscript page from Orhan Pamuk’s notebook for The Black Book.

I really want to know what colour ink he’s using.

Ordered a three-pack of Scout Books from the The Journal Shop last week – I think they might be the only UK stockist.
I’m still trying to find the right combination of fountain pen and ink for it. My old bottle of Noodler’s Bulletproof Black seems to be the most well-behaved so far, with no feathering or bleed-through. Or will we be in a pencil situation?

Ordered a three-pack of Scout Books from the The Journal Shop last week – I think they might be the only UK stockist.

I’m still trying to find the right combination of fountain pen and ink for it. My old bottle of Noodler’s Bulletproof Black seems to be the most well-behaved so far, with no feathering or bleed-through. Or will we be in a pencil situation?